polyracial music tends to be incredible.


POST
Jul 22
12:15 pm

STRAIGHT
FIRE


VIDEO
Jul 22
12:02 pm

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PHOTOSET
Jul 21
4:54 pm
3 notes
sarahsmilephoto:

© sarah smile photography
feeling blurry this week // santa barbara, california

sarahsmilephoto:

© sarah smile photography

feeling blurry this week // santa barbara, california


PHOTO
Jul 21
4:49 pm
2 notes

about to listen to No Sleep (2014) By Volumes. First new metal album I’ve listened to this year. 

Used to listen to Via on repeat back in ‘11.

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POST
Jul 15
11:06 pm
1 note

We must have one love, one great love in our life, since it gives us an alibi for all the moments when we are filled with despair.”
—  Albert Camus, Notebooks 1935-1942

We must have one love, one great love in our life, since it gives us an alibi for all the moments when we are filled with despair.

—  Albert Camus, Notebooks 1935-1942

(Source: extraordinarytime, via fuckyeahexistentialism)


PHOTO
Jul 15
8:37 pm
21,317 notes
fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

The hummingbird has long been admired for its ability to hover in flight. The key to this behavior is the bird’s capability to produce lift on both its downstroke and its upstroke. The animation above shows a simulation of hovering hummingbird. The kinematics of the bird’s flapping—the figure-8 motion and the twist of the wings through each cycle—are based on high-speed video of actual hummingbirds. These data were then used to construct a digital model of a hummingbird, about which scientists simulated airflow. About 70% of the lift each cycle is generated by the downstroke, much of it coming from the leading-edge vortex that develops on the wing. The remainder of the lift is creating during the upstroke as the bird pulls its wings back. During this part of the cycle, the flexible hummingbird twists its wings to a very high angle of attack, which is necessary to generate and maintain a leading-edge vortex on the upstroke. The full-scale animation is here. (Image credit: J. Song et al.; via Wired; submitted by averagegrdy)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

The hummingbird has long been admired for its ability to hover in flight. The key to this behavior is the bird’s capability to produce lift on both its downstroke and its upstroke. The animation above shows a simulation of hovering hummingbird. The kinematics of the bird’s flapping—the figure-8 motion and the twist of the wings through each cycle—are based on high-speed video of actual hummingbirds. These data were then used to construct a digital model of a hummingbird, about which scientists simulated airflow. About 70% of the lift each cycle is generated by the downstroke, much of it coming from the leading-edge vortex that develops on the wing. The remainder of the lift is creating during the upstroke as the bird pulls its wings back. During this part of the cycle, the flexible hummingbird twists its wings to a very high angle of attack, which is necessary to generate and maintain a leading-edge vortex on the upstroke. The full-scale animation is here. (Image credit: J. Song et al.; via Wired; submitted by averagegrdy)

(via proofmathisbeautiful)


PHOTO
Jul 15
9:04 am
1,578 notes

wallflowerrr:

ohnohowdoitumblr:

THE GROWLERS | Someday

One day you’re gonna be my wife, you’ll never have to worry again I’m gonna be your man. Oh, someday

(via w-a-v-v-v-e-s)

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AUDIO
Jul 14
12:30 am
1,045 notes

PHOTOSET
Jul 13
9:55 pm
662 notes

snowce:

The Kingdom of Dreams and Madness (2013)

(Source: likebookends, via actuallygrimes)


PHOTOSET
Jul 13
6:04 pm
16,329 notes

Andres Avalos. 20. Californian. Salvadoran. UCSB. Class of 2015. Studying Mathematics & Physics.

Music and art matter.

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